Nondischargeable Debt

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DEFINITION of 'Nondischargeable Debt'

A type of debt that cannot be eliminated through bankruptcy proceeding. Such debts include, but are not limited to, student loans, most federal, state and local taxes, money borrowed on a credit card to pay those taxes, and child support and alimony.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nondischargeable Debt'

Some additional debts may be nondischargeable, but only if the creditor objects to the discharge. These include debts arising from a martial settlement or divorce decree, debts incurred based on fraudulent acts, debts from willful and malicious acts to another person or another person's property and debts from embezzlement, larceny, or a breach of fiduciary responsibility.

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