Noninterest Expense

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DEFINITION of 'Noninterest Expense'

Fixed operating costs that a financial institution must incur, such as anticipated bad debt provisions. Noninterest expenses can include employee salaries and benefits, equipment and property leases, taxes, loan loss provisions and professional service fees. Companies will offset noninterest expenses by generating revenue through noninterest income.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Noninterest Expense'

Employee compensation (salaries and benefits) typically comprise the largest portion of an institution's noninterest expenses. Usually these expenses relate to activities that are not associated with targeting customers to deposit funds in the bank.

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