Nonmonetary Assets


DEFINITION of 'Nonmonetary Assets'

Assets in which the right to receive a fixed or determinable amount of currency is absent. This feature distinguishes nonmonetary assets from monetary assets such as cash, bank deposits, and accounts and notes receivable, which can be converted into a fixed or determinable amount of currency. Nonmonetary assets include intangible assets such as copyrights and patents, goodwill, inventories, property, plant and equipment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Nonmonetary Assets'

In some cases, it may not be readily apparent whether an asset is a monetary or nonmonetary one. In such cases, the determining factor is whether it represents an amount that can be settled in or converted into monetary terms in a very short time frame, in which case it is a monetary asset; if it cannot be settled in monetary terms, it is a nonmonetary asset.

  1. Goodwill

    An account that can be found in the assets portion of a company's ...
  2. Intangible Asset

    An asset that is not physical in nature. Corporate intellectual ...
  3. Net Tangible Assets

    Calculated as the total assets of a company, minus any intangible ...
  4. Tangible Asset

    Assets that have a physical form. Tangible assets include both ...
  5. Patent

    A government license that gives the holder exclusive rights to ...
  6. Accountant

    A professional who performs accounting functions such as audits ...
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  1. Should computer software be classified as an intangible asset or part of property, ...

    In accounting terms, an intangible asset is something of value that is not of physical nature. On the other hand, property, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>

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