DEFINITION of 'Non-Negotiable'

1. A term relating to the price of a good or security which is firmly established and cannot be adjusted.

2. A term relating to a good or security whose ownership is not easily transferable from one party to another.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Negotiable'

1. When an asking price is considered non-negotiable, it means that you cannot try to change the price as it has been firmly established.

2. Securities and products that are considered non-negotiable cannot be transferred from one party to the next and thus are typically illiquid.

An example of a non-negotiable instrument would be a government savings bond. These can only be redeemed by the owner of the bond and are not allowed to be sold to other parties.

Also known as registered securities, non-marketable or non-transferable securities.

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  2. Adhesion Contract

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  3. Registered Security

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  6. Series HH Bond

    A 20-year non-marketable U.S. government savings bond that pays ...
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