Non-Recourse Debt

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Recourse Debt'

A type of loan that is secured by collateral, which is usually property. If the borrower defaults, the issuer can seize the collateral, but cannot seek out the borrower for any further compensation, even if the collateral does not cover the full value of the defaulted amount. This is one instance where the borrower does not have personal liability for the loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Recourse Debt'

These types of projects are characterized by high capital expenditures, long loan periods and uncertain revenue streams. Analyzing them requires a sound knowledge of the underlying technical domain as well as financial modeling skills.

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