Nonrecurring Gain Or Loss

DEFINITION of 'Nonrecurring Gain Or Loss'

A one-time or highly infrequent profit or loss. One-time gains or losses are reported separately in a coporation's income statement - net of income taxes - and are not shown to affect earnings per share (EPS).

Also referred to as "extraordinary charges" for accounting purposes.

BREAKING DOWN 'Nonrecurring Gain Or Loss'

Capital gains from the sale of land or casualty losses are items that are often seen as nonrecurring gains and losses. Write-offs or write-downs relating to normal business expenses (i.e. inventory) are not be considered nonrecurring losses unless they are due to one-time events, such as a natural disaster.

Investors need to carefully examine a company's financial statements to see what types of nonrecurring gains and/or losses a holding posts and how frequently they engage in these types of transactions. While by their very nature nonrecurring gains and losses are meant to occur very infrequently, the reality is that companies often report these types of expenses.

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