Nonrecurring Charge

What is a 'Nonrecurring Charge'

An entry that appears on a company's financial statements for a one-time expense that is unlikely to happen again. A nonrecurring charge is a one-time charge for an unpredictable event.


Also known as a nonrecurring item.

BREAKING DOWN 'Nonrecurring Charge'

Nonrecurring charges appear on a company's financial statements under operating expenses. The company's earnings are correspondingly reduced for the time period shown in the financial statement; however, notations will make it clear that the nonrecurring charge is for a one-time, unusual event, and should not be considered an expense that the company will be exposed to again in the future. An example of a nonrecurring charge would be costs associated with replacing windows following a natural disaster.

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