Nonrecurring Charge

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Nonrecurring Charge'

An entry that appears on a company's financial statements for a one-time expense that is unlikely to happen again. A nonrecurring charge is a one-time charge for an unpredictable event.


Also known as a nonrecurring item.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nonrecurring Charge'

Nonrecurring charges appear on a company's financial statements under operating expenses. The company's earnings are correspondingly reduced for the time period shown in the financial statement; however, notations will make it clear that the nonrecurring charge is for a one-time, unusual event, and should not be considered an expense that the company will be exposed to again in the future. An example of a nonrecurring charge would be costs associated with replacing windows following a natural disaster.

RELATED TERMS
  1. One-Time Item

    An accounting item in a company's income statement that is non-recurring ...
  2. Discontinued Operations

    A segment of a company's business that has been sold, disposed ...
  3. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  4. Surcharge

    A fee or other charge that is added to the cost of a good or ...
  5. Write-Down

    Reducing the book value of an asset because it is overvalued ...
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    A method of evaluating a security that entails attempting to ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the consequences of one party violating the terms of a letter of intent?

    The chemicals sector consists of a diverse group of companies that operate in different industries, such as specialty chemicals, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What happens to the company stock if a subsidiary gets spun off?

    When a subsidiary gets spun off, the company's stock tends to drop. However, the investor in the stock does not lose any ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What Book Value Of Equity Per Share (BVPS) ratio indicates a buy signal?

    Book value of equity per share (BVPS) is a ratio used in fundamental analysis to compare the amount of a company's shareholders' ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the effective interest method of amortization?

    The effective interest method is an accounting practice used for discounting a bond. This method is used for bonds sold at ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does an unfavorable variance indicate to management?

    In managerial accounting, an unfavorable variance is discovered when a company's management performs a comparison between ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Material Adverse Effect A Warning Sign For Stocks

    Learn what this phrase means and how to spot it in a company's financial statements.
  2. Investing Basics

    12 Things You Need To Know About Financial Statements

    Discover how to keep score of companies to increase your chances of choosing a winner.
  3. Professionals

    Warning Signs Of A Company In Trouble

    Don't let your clients go down with ship! Learn how to escape sinking with these tips.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Financial Footnotes: Start Reading The Fine Print

    Find out what could be hidden in this often-overlooked part of the financial statements.
  5. Active Trading

    Evaluate Stock Price With Reverse-Engineering DCF

    This is a more accurate method to use when trying to find a target price for a stock.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Pro-Forma Earnings

    These figures can either shed light on a company's performance or skew it. Find out why.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Impairment Charges: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

    Impairment charge is a term for writing off worthless goodwill, but you need to know what its potential impact is on EPS.
  8. Forex Education

    Understanding The Income Statement

    Learn how to use revenue and expenses, among other factors, to break down and analyze a company.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding The Federal Reserve Balance Sheet

    We are all connected to the Fed's balance sheet, and the currency notes that we hold are its liabilities.
  10. Stock Analysis

    3 Stocks To Buy and Hold For the Rest of 2015

    One of the dominant themes to consider for 2015 is the normalization of monetary policy as the Fed raises interest rates.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  2. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  3. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  4. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  5. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  6. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!