Nonrevolver

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DEFINITION of 'Nonrevolver'

A credit card holder who pays his or her balance in full each month within the stated grace period on the account. By using the card in this manner the account holder does not incur finance charges or interest payments.

Also sometimes referred to as a "deadbeat" or "convenience user," since the credit card company does not earn any interest or non-interest revenue from the account, and the customer is able to use the card for his or her convenience instead of writing checks or using cash.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nonrevolver'

Nonrevolvers will typically pay more attention to the grace period – the time between when a bill is sent and interest is charged on the unpaid balance – than the annual percentage rate (APR) on the card, since the holder does not intend to carry a balance. In addition, nonrevolvers are likely to make sure they do not incur an over-the-limit fee or use the card for cash advances, which incur a cost as well.

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