Nonsegregated Disclosures

DEFINITION of 'Nonsegregated Disclosures '

Information that legally must be presented anywhere in a lease agreement. Nonsegregated disclosures are required by the Federal Reserve Board Regulation M. The lease agreement must also contain segregated disclosures, which are placed in a distinct and defined section of the contract. These are intended to protect consumers by clearly providing them with all the information they need to understand the contracts they are entering.

BREAKING DOWN 'Nonsegregated Disclosures '

Nonsegregated disclosures include information about government-required fees and taxes; whether the lessor or lessee will be responsible for insurance and how much it will cost; the leased item's estimated residual value; standards of excess wear and tear; lessor and lessee maintenance responsibilities; early termination and default; warranties; lessor's security interest; late payment fees; and whether there is a purchase option and what the purchase option price is.

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