Normalized Earnings

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DEFINITION of 'Normalized Earnings'

1. Earnings adjusted for cyclical ups and downs in the economy.

2. On the balance sheet, earnings adjusted to remove unusual or one-time influences.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Normalized Earnings'

An example would be removing a land sale in which a large capital gain was realized.

Normalized earnings help show the true earnings from operations.

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