Normative Economics

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What is 'Normative Economics'

Normative economics is a perspective on economics that incorporates subjectivity within its analyses. It is the study or presentation of "what ought to be" rather than what actually is. Normative economics deals heavily in value judgments and theoretical scenarios. It is the opposite of positive economics.

BREAKING DOWN 'Normative Economics'

Normative statements are often heard in the media because they tend to represent a theory or opinion rather than objective analysis. Normative economics is a valuable way to establish goals and generate new ideas, but it should not be used as a basis for policy decisions.

An example of a normative economic statement would be, "We should cut taxes in half to increase disposable income levels". By contrast, a positive (or objective) economic observation would be, "Big tax cuts would help many people, but government budget constraints make that option infeasible."

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