Notarize

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Notarize'

The act of officially certifying a legal document by a notary public. The purpose of having a legal document notarized is to ensure the authenticity of the signatures that appear on the document. Once notarized, a document will have much more legal credibility and will stand up much better in court if it is ever challenged.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Notarize'

It is a common practice to notarize legal documents that deal with serious matters or that are intended to represent transactions of substantial monetary value. Deeds prepared in the course of real estate transactions are commonly notarized so that both parties have an added level of security that the transaction will hold up if ever legally challenged, or if one party attempts to escape the terms of the transaction at a later date.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Real Estate

    Land plus anything on it, including buildings and natural resources.
  2. Mortgage

    A debt instrument, secured by the collateral of specified real ...
  3. Free and Clear

    A slang phrase describing the situation of someone when he or ...
  4. Second Lien Debt

    Debts that are subordinate to the rights of other, more senior ...
  5. Encumbered Securities

    Securities that are owned by one entity, but subject to a legal ...
  6. Real Estate Owned - REO

    Property owned by a lender - usually a bank - after an unsuccessful ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a family Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is maintenance of standard of living for survivors accomplished in estate planning?

    Estate planning is an integral component of comprehensive financial planning, as it allows individuals and couples to maintain ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between an intervivos trust and a testamentary trust?

    Estate planning offers tools to establish and maintain effective control over cash, investment and real estate assets during ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the differences between a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and a Certified ...

    The differences between a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) are many, but comes down ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between revocable and irrevocable intervivos trusts?

    Within estate planning, individuals have a myriad of options for maintaining control over assets beyond the grave. A tool ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does a revocable trust become a split-interest trust?

    A revocable trust is set up during the lifetime of the grantor who begins the trust. The grantor has the right to modify ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    Tips For The Prospective Landlord

    Investing in rental property can generate serious income, but there's more to it than collecting rent.
  2. Savings

    How To Open And Access An Offshore Bank Account

    You don't have to be a master criminal or billionaire to open an offshore bank account. This article will walk you through the process.
  3. Personal Finance

    Promissory Notes: Not Your Average IOU

    These may be a handy way to borrow money, but this convenience does not come without risk.
  4. Home & Auto

    Simple Ways To Invest In Real Estate

    Owning property isn't always easy, but there are plenty of perks. Find out how to buy in.
  5. Personal Finance

    5 Signs You Need A Postnup

    They're not the most fun thing to contemplate, but these contracts can actually help a marriage.
  6. Taxes

    10 Little Known Ways To Reduce Your 401(k) Taxes

    These clever strategies will help you hold onto your money – so you'll have more available for your retirement.
  7. Entrepreneurship

    MLPs: How They Are Taxed

    The advantages of MLPs outweigh the disadvantages, especially if you play your cards right.
  8. Professionals

    5 Ways to Mess Up Estate Planning

    There are several ways to make an estate plan defective, most of which can be easily avoided by periodic plan reviews.
  9. Retirement

    How To Set Up A Trust Fund In The U.K.

    A guide to the whys and wherefores of setting up this most versatile of estate-planning instruments in the United Kingdom.
  10. Professionals

    Top Retirement Planning Tips for Same-Sex Couples

    Financial advisors who work with same-sex couples need to be aware of these key factors to provide effective advice.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  2. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  3. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  4. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  5. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
  6. Risk-Return Tradeoff

    The principle that potential return rises with an increase in risk. Low levels of uncertainty (low-risk) are associated with ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!