Note Auction

DEFINITION of 'Note Auction'

A formal bidding process that is scheduled on a regular basis by the U.S. Treasury. Currently there are 17 authorized securities dealers (primary dealers) that are obligated to bid on each issue. All Treasury notes are originally issued in this manner.

BREAKING DOWN 'Note Auction'

The amount of money bid by the highest bidder at these auctions will determine the interest rate paid on each issue. The primary dealers have the option of holding, selling or trading their issues after purchase. The demand for Treasury notes by these dealers will vary according to economic and market conditions.

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