Nouriel Roubini

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DEFINITION of 'Nouriel Roubini'

An economist largely known for his prediction of the 2008 financial crisis. Roubini is an economics professor at New York University, a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow with the Centre for Economic Policy Research, chairman of consulting firm Roubini Global Economics and a columnist for Forbes. He has an extensive knowledge of emerging markets and a Ph.D. in international economics from Harvard. Born in Istanbul in 1959, Roubini grew up in Iran, Israel and Italy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nouriel Roubini'

When Roubini foresaw the 2008 financial crisis back in 2006, some economists dismissed his predications because of his reputation for being perpetually bearish. His attitudes have earned him the nickname, "Dr. Doom," but he has also risen from obscurity to become a respected economic advisor.



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