National Securities Clearing Corporation - NSCC

DEFINITION of 'National Securities Clearing Corporation - NSCC'

A subsidiary of the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC) that provides centralized clearing, risk management, information and settlement services to the financial industry. The NSCC offers multilateral netting so that brokers can offset buy and sell positions into a single payment obligation, thereby reducing financial exposure and capital requirements.

BREAKING DOWN 'National Securities Clearing Corporation - NSCC'

The National Securities Clearing Corporation was established in 1976 and is a registered clearing corporation regulated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Before its inception, huge demand of paper stock certificates were a reality for stock brokerages, causing the stock exchanges to close once a week. To overcome this problem, multilateral netting was proposed, leading to the formation of the NSCC. The corporation serves as a seller for every buyer, and buyer for every seller for trades settled in U.S. markets.


The NSCC and DTC (another subsidiary of the DTCC) play a major part in the settlement and clearing of securities transactions. They are the largest providers of these services, worldwide.

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