What are 'Non-Sufficient Funds - NSF'

Non-sufficient funds (NSF) is the status of a checking account that does not have enough money to cover transactions. The acronym also describes the fee incurred from these checks, and colloquially, NSF checks are known as bounced checks or bad checks. If a bank receives a check written on an account with insufficient funds, the bank can refuse payment and charge the account holder an NSF fee.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Sufficient Funds - NSF'

Banks charge NSF fees when they return checks for non-sufficient funds. The fees many banks charge for NSF checks are a point of contention between consumers and banks. Consumer advocates allege that since fees are usually a fixed amount, a customer may, in effect, be paying extraordinarily high interest rates for relatively small deficits in their accounts. Alternatively, the bank may honor the check, leaving the account holder with a deficit balance, but in this case, it is not an NSF check but an overdraft, labeled OD.

Overdraft Vs. NSF Fees

Banks charge NSF fees when they return checks and OD fees when they accept checks which overdraw checking accounts. Imagine, for example, someone has $100 in his checking account, and he initiates an ACH or electronic check payment for a purchase in the amount of $120. If his bank refuses to pay the check, he incurs an NSF fee and faces any penalties or charges the seller assesses for returned checks. If his bank accepts the check and pays the seller, his checking account balance falls to -$20 and incurs an OD fee.

NSF Check Laws

In 2010, the U.S. government created a set of sweeping bank-reform laws to address OD and NSF fees among other consumer banking issues. Under the laws, consumers can opt into overdraft protection through their banks. Opting into overdraft protection affects credit and debit card transactions in particular.

For example, a person has $20 in his checking account and attempts to make a $40 purchase with a debit or check card. If he has not opted into his bank's overdraft plan, the transaction will be declined by the retailer, but if he has opted in, the transaction may be accepted, and the bank may assess an OD fee. If he writes a check for $40, the bank may honor it and assess an OD fee or reject it and assess an NSF fee, regardless of whether he has opted into its overdraft program.

Avoiding NSF Fees

Bank customers can avoid NSF fees by keeping extra amounts of cash in their checking accounts so that they do not overdraw the accounts accidentally. In addition, customers should carefully monitor the use of checks, debit cards and automated charges, which are common causes of overdrafts.

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