Nuncupative Will

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DEFINITION of 'Nuncupative Will'

A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will is considered a "deathbed" will, meaning that it is a safety for people struck with a terminal illness and robbed of the ability or time to draft a proper written will.

BREAKING DOWN 'Nuncupative Will'

Nuncupative wills are usually considered invalid, especially when they contradict an existing legal will.

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