Nuncupative Will

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Nuncupative Will'

A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will is considered a "deathbed" will, meaning that it is a safety for people struck with a terminal illness and robbed of the ability or time to draft a proper written will.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nuncupative Will'

Nuncupative wills are usually considered invalid, especially when they contradict an existing legal will.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Oral Will

    An oral will is one that is communicated orally to witnesses, ...
  2. Viatical Settlement

    An arrangement in which someone with a terminal disease sells ...
  3. Life Insurance

    A protection against the loss of income that would result if ...
  4. Inheritance

    All or part of a person's estate/assets that is given to an heir ...
  5. Life Expectancy

    1. The age until which a person is expected to live. 2. The ...
  6. Will

    A legally enforceable declaration of how a person wishes his ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a family Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is maintenance of standard of living for survivors accomplished in estate planning?

    Estate planning is an integral component of comprehensive financial planning, as it allows individuals and couples to maintain ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between an intervivos trust and a testamentary trust?

    Estate planning offers tools to establish and maintain effective control over cash, investment and real estate assets during ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the differences between a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and a Certified ...

    The differences between a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) are many, but comes down ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between revocable and irrevocable intervivos trusts?

    Within estate planning, individuals have a myriad of options for maintaining control over assets beyond the grave. A tool ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does a revocable trust become a split-interest trust?

    A revocable trust is set up during the lifetime of the grantor who begins the trust. The grantor has the right to modify ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    15 Insurance Policies You Don't Need

    Learn how to save money by saying "no" to unnecessary coverage.
  2. Retirement

    Bursting Boomers' Inheritance Dreams

    Waiting for a big payload from an aging relative? The chance of cashing in is lower than you think.
  3. Options & Futures

    An Estate Planning Must: Update Your Beneficiaries

    Life changes make it time to rewrite your plan's designations.
  4. Retirement

    Skipping-Out on Probate Costs

    Don't let bad estate planning lead to unnecessary costs and stress for your inheritors.
  5. Retirement

    Estate Planning Basics

    Deciding what will happen to your assets when you pass away is a must - no matter how wealthy you are.
  6. Insurance

    Indexed Universal Life Insurance: The Pros & Cons

    What you need to know, to see if these vehicles fit into your financial plan.
  7. Taxes

    Estate Planning for a Surviving Spouse

    Estate planning for surviving spouses can be difficult for a number of reasons, so it's important to have good support and financial advice.
  8. Professionals

    Gay Marriage Ruling: Its Impact on Estate Planning

    Same-sex couples now face the same legal and financial issues as heterosexual couples; some may need to adopt simpler, more mainstream financial plans.
  9. Taxes

    3 Secrets You Didn't Know About Estate Planning

    Every advisor and saver needs to know these three estate planning secrets.
  10. Retirement

    Roth 401(k) Vs. Roth IRA: Which One Is Better?

    It all depends on your age, your income - and your plans for your retirement nest egg.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  2. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  3. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  4. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  5. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  6. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!