New York Stock Exchange - NYSE

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DEFINITION of 'New York Stock Exchange - NYSE'

A stock exchange based in New York City, which is considered the largest equities-based exchange in the world based on total market capitalization of its listed securities. Formerly run as a private organization, the NYSE became a public entity in 2005 following the acquisition of electronic trading exchange Archipelago. The parent company of the New York Stock Exchange is now called NYSE Euronext, following a merger with the European exchange in 2007.

Also known as the "Big Board", the NYSE relied for many years on floor trading only, using the open outcry system. Today, more than half of all NYSE trades are conducted electronically, although floor traders are still used to set pricing and deal in high volume institutional trading.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'New York Stock Exchange - NYSE'

The origins of the exchange date all the way back to 1792. Because of its long operating history the NYSE is home to the majority of the world's largest and best-known companies. Foreign-based corporations can list their shares on the NYSE if they adhere to certain Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules, known as listing standards.

The NYSE opens for trading Monday through Friday 9:30a.m. to 4:00p.m. (ET), closing early on rare occasions. The market also shuts down during nine holidays throughout the year.

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