NYSE Composite Index


DEFINITION of 'NYSE Composite Index'

An index that measures the performance of all stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The NYSE Composite Index includes more than 1,900 stocks, of which over 1,500 are U.S. companies. Its breadth therefore makes it a much better indicator of market performance than narrow indexes that have far fewer components. The weights of the index constituents are calculated on the basis of their free-float market capitalization. The index itself is calculated on the basis of price return and total return, which includes dividends.

BREAKING DOWN 'NYSE Composite Index'

The NYSE Composite Index includes all NYSE-listed stocks, including foreign stocks, American Depositary Receipts, real estate investment trusts and tracking stocks. The index excludes closed-end funds, ETFs, limited partnerships and derivatives.

The two biggest benefits to investors of the NYSE Composite Index are (a) its quality, since all its constituents have to meet the stringent listing requirements of the exchange, and (b) its global diversification, with non-US companies accounting for more than one-third of market capitalization. NYSE-listed foreign companies have their headquarters in 38 different countries, with the most foreign issuers from Canada, China, the U.K., Japan and Mexico.

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