O

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DEFINITION of 'O'

A component of a stock symbol that indicates the shares of that stock are a second class of preferred shares. The "O" identifier can be seen after the dot of a NYSE stock symbol, or as the fifth letter of a Nasdaq symbol.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'O'

Every security on the market is assigned a ticker symbol, and preferred stocks use the letters M, N, O and P to denote the preferred stock's class. Companies can issue several classes of preferred stock at a time, and the highest-ranked preferred stock receives dividend payments first.

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