Ocean Bill Of Lading

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DEFINITION of 'Ocean Bill Of Lading'

A document required for the transportation of goods overseas. An ocean bill of lading serves as both the carrier's receipt to the shipper and as a collection document. The document specifies the details of the goods being transported, such as quantity, type and destination.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Ocean Bill Of Lading'

A non-negotiable ocean bill of lading allows the buyer to receive the goods upon showing identification. If the bill is deemed negotiable, then the buyer will be required to pay the shipper for the products and meet any of the seller's other conditions.

An ocean bill of lading allows the shipper to move goods across international waters. If the goods are to be initially shipped over land, an additional document, known as an "inland bill of lading", will be required. The inland bill only allows the materials to reach the shore, while the ocean bill allows them to be transported overseas.

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