Odd Date

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Odd Date'

A type of maturity date for foreign-exchange contracts. Odd dates are neither spot nor fixed dates; they are simply random, unrelated dates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Odd Date'

For example, if a foreign contract has a three-month maturity and begins on November 15th, it would therefore mature on February 15th. An odd date would be February 14th or any date other than the 15th.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Exchange Rate

    The price of a nation’s currency in terms of another currency. ...
  2. Foreign Currency Swap

    An agreement to make a currency exchange between two foreign ...
  3. Maturity

    The period of time for which a financial instrument remains outstanding. ...
  4. Foreign Currency Effects

    The gain or loss on foreign investments due to changes in the ...
  5. Currency

    A generally accepted form of money, including coins and paper ...
  6. Optimal Currency Area

    The geographic area in which a single currency would create the ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is the value of a pip determined?

    A pip in foreign exchange trading is a measure of a price movement in a currency pair. "Pip" is an acronym for price interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) priced?

    The price of an American depositary receipt (ADR) is determined by the bank or other financial institution that issues it. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are double exponential moving averages applied in technical analysis?

    Double exponential moving averages (DEMAS) are commonly used in technical analysis like any other moving average indicator ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) exchanged?

    American depositary receipts (ADRs) are bought and sold on regular U.S. stock exchanges, either in the over-the-counter market ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Fundamentals

    What Causes A Currency Crisis?

    Find out what can cause a currency to collapse, and what central banks can do to help.
  2. Forex Education

    The Greatest Currency Trades Ever Made

    These speculators took big positions - and scored huge profits - in the currency market.
  3. Forex Education

    Currency Exchange: Floating Rate Vs. Fixed Rate

    Baffled by exchange rates? Wonder why some currencies fluctuate while others are pegged? This article has the answers.
  4. Forex Education

    The New World Of Emerging Market Currencies

    Take advantage of foreign currency markets without stepping out of your house.
  5. Investing Basics

    Understanding Total Return Swaps

    A total return swap is a contract in which a payer and receiver exchange the credit risk and market risk of an underlying asset.
  6. Economics

    What Is a Quota?

    In business, quota usually refers to the sales target for a salesperson or a sales team.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Price Targets

    A price target is what an investment analyst projects a security’s future price to be.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Present Value Interest Factor of Annuity (PVIFA)

    PVIFA can be used to calculate the present value of a series of annuities by considering cash flows and depreciation.
  9. Investing Basics

    What are Cash Equivalents?

    Cash equivalents are money market instruments.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  2. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  3. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  4. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  5. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  6. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!