Odd Date

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DEFINITION of 'Odd Date'

A type of maturity date for foreign-exchange contracts. Odd dates are neither spot nor fixed dates; they are simply random, unrelated dates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Odd Date'

For example, if a foreign contract has a three-month maturity and begins on November 15th, it would therefore mature on February 15th. An odd date would be February 14th or any date other than the 15th.

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