Odd Lotter

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DEFINITION of 'Odd Lotter'

An individual investor who buys securities, usually stocks, in odd lots. This is the opposite of someone who buys securities in round lots.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Odd Lotter'

A round lot is 100 stocks; therefore, someone buying any number that is not a multiple of 100 would be considered an odd lotter.

RELATED TERMS
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  2. Lot

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  3. Odd Lot

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