Odd Lotter


DEFINITION of 'Odd Lotter'

An individual investor who buys securities, usually stocks, in odd lots. This is the opposite of someone who buys securities in round lots.


A round lot is 100 stocks; therefore, someone buying any number that is not a multiple of 100 would be considered an odd lotter.

  1. Security

    A financial instrument that represents an ownership position ...
  2. Lot

    In general, any group of goods or services making up a transaction. ...
  3. Odd Lot

    An order amount for a security that is less than the normal unit ...
  4. Block Trade

    An order or trade submitted for sale or purchase of a large quantity ...
  5. Round Lot

    A group of 100 shares of a stock, or any group of shares that ...
  6. Odd Lot Theory

    A technical analysis theory/indicator based on the assumption ...
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