Odd Lot Theory


DEFINITION of 'Odd Lot Theory'

A technical analysis theory/indicator based on the assumption that the small individual investor is always wrong. Therefore, if odd lot sales are up - that is small investors are selling stock - it is probably a good time to buy.

BREAKING DOWN 'Odd Lot Theory'

This approach assumes small investors have a low risk tolerance and tend not to hold a stock for the long-term.

  1. Mixed Lot

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  2. Lot

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  3. Odd Lot

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  4. Qualitative Analysis

    Securities analysis that uses subjective judgment based on nonquantifiable ...
  5. Discounted Cash Flow (DCF)

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