Off-Floor Order

DEFINITION of 'Off-Floor Order'

An investor's directive to buy or sell securities when that directive is given to a broker, not to a trader working on the trading floor of an exchange. Exchange rules require off-floor orders, which are made on behalf of customers, to be executed before on-floor orders, which are made for exchange members'own accounts. In some cases, an off-floor order can be reclassified as an on-floor order where a conflict of interest might exist.

BREAKING DOWN 'Off-Floor Order'

To be a floor trader, one must be associated with a member firm. Member firms pay hefty fees for the privilege of trading on the floor.



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