Offering Price

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DEFINITION of 'Offering Price'

The price at which publicly issued securities are made available for purchase by the investment bank underwriting the issue. A security's offering price includes the underwriter's fee and any management fees applicable to the issue.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Offering Price'

Underwriters analyze numerous factors when attempting to determine a security's offering price. Ideally, an investment bank should accurately assess the value of the securities and the underlying firm, raising funds for the issuing company and selling the securities to investors for a fair offering price.

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