DEFINITION of 'Office Of The Superintendent Of Financial Institutions - OSFI'

An independent agency responsible for the regulation of banks, insurance companies, trusts and pension plans in Canada. The Office Of The Superintendent Of Financial Institutions reports to the Minister of Finance. It was formed in 1987 when the Department of Insurance and the Office of the Inspector General of Banks were combined.

BREAKING DOWN 'Office Of The Superintendent Of Financial Institutions - OSFI'

The OSFI is designed to maintain consumer confidence in the financial markets. To accomplish this, it guarantees the deposits through the Canadian Deposit Insurance Corporation (CDIC), reviews the pension plans of businesses to ensure that they are properly funded and helps mitigate the impact of financial issues that may crop up.

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