Official Strike


DEFINITION of 'Official Strike'

A work stoppage by union members that is endorsed by the union and that follows the legal requirements for striking, such as being voted on by a majority of union members. Workers engaging in official strikes have better protections against being fired.

Also called "official industrial action."

BREAKING DOWN 'Official Strike'

A famous official strike in the United States was the 1994 Major League Baseball strike, which canceled the end of the regular season and the entire postseason. Some of the replacement players who played during 1995 spring training, when the strike had not yet ended, remained in the major leagues, but are not allowed union membership to this day. One reason why this is important is because union players receive a certain percentage of Major League Baseball revenues, because MLB licenses players' names and images for items like jerseys and baseball cards. Non-union members do not receive this benefit.

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