Oil Price to Natural Gas Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Oil Price to Natural Gas Ratio'

A mathematical ratio comparing the prices of crude oil and natural gas. In the oil price to natural gas ratio formula, the oil price is the numerator and the price of natural gas is the denominator. This ratio is used by energy analysts, traders and investors to gauge the market of oil versus that of natural gas.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Oil Price to Natural Gas Ratio'

The higher the oil price to natural gas ratio, the greater the demand for oil. For example, a ratio of 6:1 means that a barrel of crude oil costs six-times as much as an Mcf of natural gas. If the ratio declines, then difference in the prices of the two commodities is narrowing.


The trading strategy supported by this ratio is to long oil when the ratio is below its historic average, and long gas when the ratio is excessive compared to previous time periods.



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