Oil Stabilization Fund (Iran)


DEFINITION of 'Oil Stabilization Fund (Iran)'

A government-controlled sovereign wealth fund managed for the government of Iran. The funds deposited with the Oil Stabilization Fund are primarily the surplus revenues from the development of Iran's oil reserves.

BREAKING DOWN 'Oil Stabilization Fund (Iran)'

The fund was established in 1999 as a way to make strategic investments and stabilize funding for the Iranian government. The fund is highly secretive and little is known about its governance, holdings or investment strategy.

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