On Account

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DEFINITION of 'On Account'

An accounting term that denotes partial payment of an amount owed or the purchase/sale of merchandise or a service on credit. For example, if a firm purchases $5,000 worth of merchandise on account, this refers to the purchase of the goods on credit and a deferral of payment.

BREAKING DOWN 'On Account'

Most lenders will accept payments on account. All installment payments of any kind, including mortgage payments, could be considered payments on account. Any purchases with credit can be referred to as purchases on account.

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