One-Sided Market

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DEFINITION of 'One-Sided Market'

When the market for a security only shows either one bid or one ask.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'One-Sided Market'

Market makers are required to maintain a two-sided market where both a bid and an ask price are shown to investors.

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