One-Stop Shop


DEFINITION of 'One-Stop Shop'

A company or a location that offers a multitude of services to a client or a customer. The idea is to provide convenient and efficient service and also to create the opportunity for the company to sell more products to clients and customers.


For example, a bank may be able to offer you not only personal banking services and loans, but also investment advice, investment vehicles and insurance policies. Compared to visiting a separate institution for each area of need, the "one-stop shop" saves the consumer a lot of time and effort.

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