Open-Market Rate

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DEFINITION of 'Open-Market Rate'

Rate of interest that is paid on any debt security that trades in the open market. Open-market rates respond directly to changes in supply and demand. Interest rates for such debt instruments as commercial paper and banker's acceptances are open-market rates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Open-Market Rate'

Open-market rates differ from the discount rate and other official rates that are set by the Federal Reserve. These rates apply to any debt instrument that trades in the secondary market. Bank commercial-loan rates do not fall into this category, as they are largely determined by Fed policy.

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