Opening Bell

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Opening Bell'

A bell that is rung to signify the start of the day's trading session. The opening bell is both a symbol of the opening of the market for the day and a physical event involving an individual striking a metal bell. Since 1985, the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) has used the opening bell to start its trading session at 9:30 a.m.

BREAKING DOWN 'Opening Bell'

With the decline in activity on the trading floor due to the increased use of electronic platforms, the opening bell has become more of a symbolic event, rather than a practical one. Today, dignitaries visiting stock markets take part in small ceremonies in which they ring the opening bell. Not all exchanges use this traditional system, with the NYSE remaining one of the more recognizable exchanges that still uses a bell.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Opening Cross

    A method used by the Nasdaq to determine the opening price for ...
  2. Open Order

    An order to buy or sell a security that remains in effect until ...
  3. Closing Bell

    A bell that rings to signify the end of a trading session. The ...
  4. Wide Open

    The gap between a stock's bid price and the ask price at the ...
  5. Trading Session

    A period of time consisting of one day of business in a financial ...
  6. After The Bell

    A phrase used to describe news, earnings reports and other activities ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Stock Basics Tutorial

    If you're new to the stock market and want the basics, this is the tutorial for you!
  2. Options & Futures

    The NYSE And Nasdaq: How They Work

    Learn some of the important differences in the way these exchanges operate and the securities that trade on them.
  3. Investing Basics

    Understanding the Spot Market

    A spot market is a market where a commodity or security is bought or sold and then delivered immediately.
  4. Investing Basics

    What is a Settlement Date?

    A settlement date is the day a security trade must be settled.
  5. Investing Basics

    What's a Price-Taker?

    Price-taker is an economic term describing a market participant who has no effect on overall market activity.
  6. Investing Basics

    What are Class B Shares?

    Class B shares are one classification of common stock issued by corporations.
  7. Investing News

    The Brief: Where Is the Bottom?

    Where is the market going today after yesterday's bumpy ride?
  8. Investing

    Finding Value in the Selloff Rubble

    Globally and in the United States, stocks are now in correction mode, with the recent erosion in equities in emerging markets and Europe in a bear market.
  9. Investing Basics

    6 Smart Strategies to Invest Your Extra Cash Now

    The world's stock markets are shaky, to say the least. Should you hold onto your cash or bargain hunt?
  10. Investing Basics

    What is a Public Company?

    A public company has sold stock to the public through an initial public offering (IPO) and that stock is currently traded on a public stock exchange.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the best time of the day to trade?

    Unlike traditional investing, trading, or day trading, has a very short-term focus. Analysis may be broken down to days, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do all international markets trade between 9:30am and 4pm local time?

    The New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq both trade between 9:30am and 4pm Eastern Time. All major stock exchanges trade at ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the history behind the opening and closing bells on the NYSE?

    Similar to the school bells that most of us heard during our school days, the New York Stock Exchange's (NYSE) opening and ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Where do penny stocks trade?

    Generally, penny stocks are traded through the use of the Over the Counter Bulletin Board (OTCBB) and through pink sheets. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Where can I buy penny stocks?

    Some penny stocks, those using the definition of trading for less than $5 per share, are traded on regular exchanges such ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does the stock market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The stock market reacts to changes in the federal funds rate in various ways depending on where it is in the business cycle. ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  2. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  3. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  4. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  5. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  6. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!