Open Offer


DEFINITION of 'Open Offer'

A secondary market offering that is similar to a rights issue in which a shareholder is given the opportunity to purchase stock at a price that is lower than the current market price. The purpose of such an offer is to raise cash for the company.


An open offer differs from a rights issue in that investors are unable to sell the stocks that they purchase under the open offer to other parties. Some investors see a secondary market offering as bad news because it causes stock dilution and may signal that the stock is overvalued.

  1. Subsequent Offering

    An offering of additional shares after the issuing company has ...
  2. Rights Offering

    An issue of rights to a company's existing shareholders that ...
  3. Overvalued

    A stock with a current price that is not justified by its earnings ...
  4. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
  5. Dilution

    A reduction in the ownership percentage of a share of stock caused ...
  6. Secondary Offering

    1. The issuance of new stock for public sale from a company that ...
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