Operating Income

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DEFINITION of 'Operating Income'

The amount of profit realized from a business's operations after taking out operating expenses - such as cost of goods sold (COGS) or wages - and depreciation. Operating income takes the gross income (revenue minus COGS) and subtracts other operating expenses and then removes depreciation. These operating expenses are costs which are incurred from operating activities and include things such as office supplies and heat and power. Operating Income is typically a synonym for earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) and is also commonly referred to as "operating profit" or "recurring profit."

Calculated as:

Operating Income = Gross Income - Operating Expenses - Depreciation & Amortization

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Operating Income'

Operating income would not include items such as investments in other firms, taxes or interest expenses. In addition, nonrecurring items such as cash paid for a lawsuit settlement are often not included.

Operating income is required to calculate operating margin, which describes a company's operating efficiency.

For more, check out Analyzing Operating Margins

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