Operating Leverage


What is 'Operating Leverage'

A measurement of the degree to which a firm or project incurs a combination of fixed and variable costs.

1. A business that makes few sales, with each sale providing a very high gross margin, is said to be highly leveraged. A business that makes many sales, with each sale contributing a very slight margin, is said to be less leveraged. As the volume of sales in a business increases, each new sale contributes less to fixed costs and more to profitability.

2. A business that has a higher proportion of fixed costs and a lower proportion of variable costs is said to have used more operating leverage. Those businesses with lower fixed costs and higher variable costs are said to employ less operating leverage.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Operating Leverage'

The higher the degree of operating leverage, the greater the potential danger from forecasting risk. That is, if a relatively small error is made in forecasting sales, it can be magnified into large errors in cash flow projections. The opposite is true for businesses that are less leveraged. A business that sells millions of products a year, with each contributing slightly to paying for fixed costs, is not as dependent on each individual sale.

For example, convenience stores are significantly less leveraged than high-end car dealerships.

  1. Cash Flow

    The net amount of cash and cash-equivalents moving into and out ...
  2. Degree Of Financial Leverage - ...

    A ratio that measures the sensitivity of a company’s earnings ...
  3. Margin

    1. Borrowed money that is used to purchase securities. This practice ...
  4. Fixed Cost

    A cost that does not change with an increase or decrease in the ...
  5. Variable Cost

    A corporate expense that varies with production output. Variable ...
  6. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
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  1. How can a firm bring down its operating leverage?

    A company with a lower percentage of fixed costs and a higher percentage of variable costs uses less operating leverage. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between operating leverage and financial leverage?

    Operating leverage and financial leverage both magnify the changes that occur to earnings due to fixed costs in a company’s ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the risks of having both high operating leverage and high financial leverage?

    In finance, the term leverage arises often. Both investors and companies employ leverage to generate greater returns on their ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can mutual funds use leverage?

    Traditionally, mutual funds have not been considered leveraged financial products. However, a number of new products have ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do hedge funds use leverage?

    Hedge funds use several forms of leverage to chase large returns. They purchase securities on margin, meaning they leverage ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do nonprofit organizations have working capital?

    Nonprofit organizations continuously face debate over how much money they bring in that is kept in reserve. These financial ... Read Full Answer >>

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