Oprah Effect

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DEFINITION of 'Oprah Effect'

The Oprah effect is an expression referring to the effect that an appearance on The Oprah Winfrey Show, or an endorsement by Oprah Winfrey, can have on a business. Because the show reaches millions of viewers each week, a recommendation from Oprah can have a significant and often unexpected influence for a new or struggling business.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Oprah Effect'

People and companies lucky enough to appeal to Oprah can find overnight success after being promoted on her show. An endorsement from Oprah can suddenly turn a small, unprofitable business into a multimillion-dollar company.

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