Order Paper

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Order Paper '

1. An order paper is a negotiable instrument that is payable to a specified person or its assignee. An instrument such as an order paper is negotiable only if it is payable to the order of a specified person, as opposed to the bearer of the instrument, and usually need to be endorsed for example with a signature. An order paper is also knows as an order instrument.


2. In the Parliament of Canada, the House of Commons and the Senate, an order paper is defined as a list of all the items that may be brought forward on that day.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Order Paper '

1. Order paper could include registered bonds, checks, bills of exchange (a kind of check without interest) and promissory notes (a written promise to pay). With a bearer paper the name of the owner is not on the document such as a bearer bond.


2. Also, an order paper is defined as a list of subjects to be discussed in the British Parliament.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Promissory Note

    A financial instrument that contains a written promise by one ...
  2. Bad Paper

    Unsecured short-term fixed income instrument that is issued either ...
  3. Negotiable Instrument

    A document that promises payment to a specified person or the ...
  4. Assignor

    A person, company or entity who transfers rights they hold to ...
  5. Two Name Paper

    A nickname assigned to trade paper. Both Trade Acceptances and ...
  6. Commercial Paper Funding Program ...

    A program instituted in October of 2008 that created the Commercial ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. No results found.
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Carries High Risk

    Asset-backed commercial paper has characteristics that make it much more risky than traditional commercial paper.
  2. Personal Finance

    Promissory Notes: Not Your Average IOU

    These may be a handy way to borrow money, but this convenience does not come without risk.
  3. Forex Education

    The History Of Money: Currency Wars

    Find out how conflicts have changed the role money plays in our lives.
  4. Economics

    Why Is Ukraine At War? A Russian Rivalry With West

    Huge power games which are being played behind the Ukrainian conflict are rooted in a previous revolution, a past Cold War, and an old Russia-West rivalry.
  5. Economics

    Does A Junk Rating Reflect Russia's Fundamentals?

    Moody’s, like other credit rating agencies, has downgraded Russia’s sovereign debt rating to non-investment grade, but does this reflect Russia's economy?
  6. Economics

    This Is A Small Country With Huge Potential to Grow

    Trinidad and Tobago's increased revenue and economic success have been primarily generated by its energy sector, but it still might be best to diversify.
  7. Economics

    Popular Places Where U.S. Citizens Need A Visa

    A U.S. passport will get you into many countries, but not everywhere. Here's how to visit five of the most popular destinations that require visas.
  8. Personal Finance

    Overdrafting

    An overdraft occurs when money is withdrawn from a bank account in an amount that exceeds the funds available in the account. Banks often permit this as a form of short-term loan to the account ...
  9. Economics

    What's a Subsidy?

    A subsidy is a benefit given to an individual, business or institution, typically by the government. Subsidies are given to promote a social good or an economic policy. The government usually ...
  10. Trading Strategies

    Eyeing a Loan? Consider Skipping the Banks

    Peer-to-peer lending platforms, such as Lending Tree, Lending Club and Prosper, offer borrowers newfound leverage. Here's a look.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  2. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  3. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  4. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  5. Law Of Supply

    A microeconomic law stating that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity ...
  6. Investment Grade

    A rating that indicates that a municipal or corporate bond has a relatively low risk of default. Bond rating firms, such ...
Trading Center