Order Paper

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DEFINITION of 'Order Paper '

1. An order paper is a negotiable instrument that is payable to a specified person or its assignee. An instrument such as an order paper is negotiable only if it is payable to the order of a specified person, as opposed to the bearer of the instrument, and usually need to be endorsed for example with a signature. An order paper is also knows as an order instrument.


2. In the Parliament of Canada, the House of Commons and the Senate, an order paper is defined as a list of all the items that may be brought forward on that day.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Order Paper '

1. Order paper could include registered bonds, checks, bills of exchange (a kind of check without interest) and promissory notes (a written promise to pay). With a bearer paper the name of the owner is not on the document such as a bearer bond.


2. Also, an order paper is defined as a list of subjects to be discussed in the British Parliament.

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