Order Splitting

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DEFINITION of 'Order Splitting'

When brokers split up larger orders to qualify them for the Small Order Execution System (SOES) and, therefore, have them automatically executed.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Order Splitting'

SOES is for individual traders with orders less than or equal to 1,000 shares. The practice of order splitting is prohibited on the Nasdaq.

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