Ordinary Dividends

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DEFINITION of 'Ordinary Dividends'

A share of a company's profits passed on to the shareholders on a periodic basis. Ordinary dividends are taxed as ordinary income and are reported on Line 9a of the Schedule B of the Form 1040. All dividends are considered ordinary unless they are specifically classified as qualified dividends.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Ordinary Dividends'

Dividend income is one of the major advantages of stock ownership. Companies will report all aggregate ordinary dividends in box 1 of the Form 1099-DIV. Mutual fund companies pay and report dividends in the same manner.

Find out how ordinary dividends affect your tax return; check out Who needs to fill out IRS Form Schedule B?

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