Organized Labor


DEFINITION of 'Organized Labor'

An association of workers united as a single, representative entity for the purpose of improving the workers' economic status and working conditions through collective bargaining with employers. Also known as "unions". There are two types: the horizontal union, in which all members share a common skill, and the vertical union, composed of workers from across the same industry.

BREAKING DOWN 'Organized Labor'

The union formation process in most countries is regulated by a government agency, such as the National Labor Relations Board in the United States. The group of employees wanting to form a union usually need a set amount of signatures, this amount is dependent on the jurisdiction it wants to form in. If enough signatures are obtained there is a vote by all employees and if passed the union will negotiate on their behalf with the employers.

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  2. Unofficial Strike

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  3. Official Strike

    A work stoppage by union members that is endorsed by the union ...
  4. Collective Bargaining

    The process of negotiating the terms of employment between an ...
  5. International Labor Organization ...

    A United Nations agency that strives to serve as a uniting force ...
  6. Employment Cost Index - ECI

    A quarterly report from the U.S. Department of Labor that measures ...
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