Origination Fee


DEFINITION of 'Origination Fee'

An up-front fee charged by a lender for processing a new loan application, used as compensation for putting the loan in place. Origination fees are quoted as a percentage of the total loan and are generally between 0.5% and 1% on mortgage loans in the United States.

BREAKING DOWN 'Origination Fee'

An origination fee is similar to any commission-based payment. If a lender takes a 1% fee for originating a loan, they will make $1,000 on a $100,000 loan, or $2,000 on a $200,000 loan. It is likely that the fee rate would be negotiated lower for bigger loans in order to obtain the valuable business.

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