Origination Fee

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Origination Fee'

An up-front fee charged by a lender for processing a new loan application, used as compensation for putting the loan in place. Origination fees are quoted as a percentage of the total loan and are generally between 0.5% and 1% on mortgage loans in the United States.

BREAKING DOWN 'Origination Fee'

An origination fee is similar to any commission-based payment. If a lender takes a 1% fee for originating a loan, they will make $1,000 on a $100,000 loan, or $2,000 on a $200,000 loan. It is likely that the fee rate would be negotiated lower for bigger loans in order to obtain the valuable business.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Mortgage

    A debt instrument, secured by the collateral of specified real ...
  2. Origination Points

    A type of fee borrowers pay to lenders or loan officers in order ...
  3. Commission

    A service charge assessed by a broker or investment advisor in ...
  4. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
  5. Origination

    The process of creating a home loan or mortgage. During the origination ...
  6. Mortgage Broker

    An intermediary who brings mortgage borrowers and mortgage lenders ...
Related Articles
  1. Credit & Loans

    Mortgage Points: What's The Point?

    Learn how to pay less for your home in the long run, or save in the short run.
  2. Home & Auto

    6 Reasons To Avoid Private Mortgage Insurance

    This costly coverage protects your mortgage lender - not you.
  3. Home & Auto

    Reverse Mortgage Pitfalls

    Before tapping your home equity, find out what can go wrong.
  4. Home & Auto

    Watch Out For "Junk" Mortgage Fees

    So many fees are tacked on to a mortgage, that it's easy to pay more than you have to.
  5. Investing

    Fee-Based Brokerage: Will They Work For You?

    Learn the pros and cons of this type of investing and whether it will work for you.
  6. Entrepreneurship

    The Rise And Demise Of New Century Financial

    A case study in how poor planning toppled a subprime mortgage giant.
  7. Home & Auto

    The Pros and Cons of Owner Financing

    Details on the upside and risks of this type of deal for both the owner and the buyer.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares US Real Estate

    Learn about the iShares US Real Estate fund, which holds shares of equity and nonequity real estate investment trusts incorporated in the United States.
  9. Credit & Loans

    Schedule Loan Repayments with Excel Formulas

    Calculate all the particulars of a loan using Excel, and set up a schedule of repayment for a mortgage or any other loan.
  10. Credit & Loans

    What Qualifies as a Nonperforming Asset?

    A nonperforming asset is a loan made by a financial institution to a borrower who has failed to make any scheduled payments for at least 90 days.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do commercial banks make money?

    Commercial banks make money by providing loans and earning interest income from those loans. Customer deposits, such as checking ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is it a good idea to add a reverse mortgage to your retirement strategy?

    A reverse mortgage can provide a good source of retirement income for homeowners who have little or no assets outside of ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. If my mortgage lender goes bankrupt, do I still have to pay my mortgage?

    Yes, if your mortgage lender goes bankrupt you do still need to pay your mortgage obligation. Sorry to disappoint, but there ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does my employer's matching contribution count towards the maximum I can contribute ...

    Contributions to 401(k) plans come from employee salary deferral and employer match dollars. According to the IRS, employees ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between "closed end credit" and a "line of credit?"

    Depending on the need, an individual or business may take out a form of credit that is either open- or closed-ended. While ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. In what instances does a business use closed end credit?

    The most common types of closed-end credit used by both businesses and individuals are mortgages and auto loans. Businesses ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  2. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  3. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  4. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  5. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  6. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!