Oslo Stock Exchange (OSL) .OL

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DEFINITION of 'Oslo Stock Exchange (OSL) .OL'

The major securities trading market in Norway, the Oslo Stock Exchange (in Norwegian, the "Oslo Børs") opened for trading in 1881. Initially, the Exchange did not see much activity, and its only function was to fix prices once a month - it did not trade any stocks. Today, equities, primary capital certificates, derivatives, fixed income instruments, mutual funds and exchange traded funds can be traded through the Oslo Stock Exchange. Its main index is the OBX Index.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Oslo Stock Exchange (OSL) .OL'

The Oslo Børs switched to a fully electronic trading system in 1999. In 2002, it joined the NOREX alliance, a group that also includes the stock exchanges of Stockholm, Copenhagen and Iceland, as part of an effort for the Nordic exchanges to attract greater international investment through a common trading platform and streamlined regulations.

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