Other Post-Retirement Benefits

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DEFINITION of 'Other Post-Retirement Benefits'

Benefits, other than pension distributions, paid to employees during their retirement years. Most post-retirement benefits include life insurance and medical plans. Although these benefits are mostly employer-paid, retired employees often share in the cost of these benefits through co-payments, payment of deductibles and making employee contributions to the plan when required.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Other Post-Retirement Benefits'

The benefits that fall within this category are all of the non-cash payment benefits available to employees including dental, vision care, legal services and tuition credits. These additional benefits, along with traditional pension benefits, can be a large expenditure for companies offering these plans, especially if the plans are fully funded by the company. The costs of these plans can be found in a company's financial statements, usually in the notes, which will also disclose the size of the obligation along with how well funded the fund is.

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