Other Current Assets - OCA

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DEFINITION of 'Other Current Assets - OCA'

A firm's assets that do not include cash, securities, receivables, inventory and prepaid assets, and can be convertible into cash within one business cycle, which is usually one year. Other current assets are listed on a firm's balance sheet, and are a component of a firm's total assets. Restricted cash or investments may be included in this figure.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Other Current Assets - OCA'

There is a category of assets, in financial statements, that are called "current" because they can be considered when calculating a firm's ability to pay short-term liabilities. Inside these current assets there are certain subcategories you will usually find like "cash." Other current assets (OCA) are not common enough to have their own category. Instead, they are lumped into this generic "other" category.

The value of a company's other current assets may vary greatly from year to year depending on the health of the company and how it spends its money. It is important to determine how material these assets are, as they may distort a firm's liquidity. An example of another current asset would be a piece of property that is being readied for sale.

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