Other Current Liabilities

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DEFINITION of 'Other Current Liabilities'

A balance sheet entry used by companies to group together current liabilities that are not assigned to common liabilities such as debt obligations or accounts payable.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Other Current Liabilities'

Companies will group together these other current liabilities into one account on the balance sheet for the sake of simplicity. Investors should be able to find out exactly which liabilities are accounted for in the other current liabilities account by reading the attached foot or end notes.

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