Over And Short

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DEFINITION of 'Over And Short'

An accounting term denoting a discrepancy between reported and examined figures – for example, a discrepancy between sales records and audited statements. If the records show a higher number than the audit, then it is short.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Over And Short'

Over and short is sometimes the result of number tampering; however, it is usually the result of simple human error. Making incorrect change or mishandling receipts can each cause this result.

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