Overall Turnover


DEFINITION of 'Overall Turnover'

A synonym for total revenues, commonly used in Europe and Asia. Overall turnover, in the North American context, may also refer to certain metrics, such as labor turnover or asset turnover for an organization as a whole. Overall turnover measures these metrics on a company-wide basis, as opposed to measuring them for a specific division or business unit.

BREAKING DOWN 'Overall Turnover'

For example, a European or Asian company's press release that announces overall turnover increased 20% last year simply means that gross revenues or total sales increased by that percentage.

If the overall inventory turnover for an American manufacturing company is 10, it means that the company as a whole generated $10 in revenues for every $1 of assets.

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